Tortiglioni with salmon, broccoli and creamy chives sauce

Tortiglioni with salmon, broccoli and creamy chives sauce Pasta, pasta, pasta...One word meaning an eternal amount of combinations. Inventing a new recipe for pasta is like a puzzle. Choosing the right shape enables the sauce and other ingredients  to adhere to...

Tortiglioni with salmon, broccoli and creamy chives sauce
Tortiglioni with salmon, broccoli and creamy chives sauce

Pasta, pasta, pasta...One word meaning an eternal amount of combinations. Inventing a new recipe for pasta is like a puzzle. Choosing the right shape enables the sauce and other ingredients  to adhere to it. Generally, it is advised to use small pasta shapes for dishes that include larger pieces of meat or vegetables, and long pasta like spaghetti for the ones that use an outstanding sauce that doesn´t need to be combined with many other ingredients. That´s why it´s usually SPAGHETTI aglio olio not PENNE aglio olio that you find on menus.

Pasta
Pasta

Personally, I don´t use farfalle ( “bow-tie pasta”) very often as it  gets huge and unmanageable and not much sauce sticks to its’ surface. On the other hand I looove linguini!  It looks like flattened spaghetti but easier to serve as it’s not round. However, for this recipe I decided to use an uncommon shape called “tortiglioni“.  If you have no or little idea about this shape, imagine PENNE, straight and  ridged with a diagonal tube end. Now, if you exchange diagonal cut for square you get RIGATONI. Imagine the straight grooves on the surface of rigatonis lanted,  you now have TORTIGLIONI. Its name stems from the Latin“torquere” or “to turn” referring to the grooves. As you can see, making just a subtle change, you have a brand new shape of pasta.  Maybe that´s why there are almost 500 different shapes.

The combination of salmon, cream sauce and pasta is quite common. Adding other ingredients, like herbs and vegetables, is up to you. I recommend also to substitute broccoli for the  asparagus during its season. Talking about herbs, salmon blends well with dill, which unfortunately, is not popular with many people. And no pasta dish is complete without a sprinkle of parmesan. It´s like fixing a hairstyle with hair spray - the piece of art is already done - this is just a little step to perfection.

Tortiglioni with salmon, broccoli and creamy chives sauce

Ingredients for 4 portions:

  • 350 g of tortiglioni
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 shallot
  • 400 g of salmon
  • 500 g of broccoli
  • 100 g cream cheese (Philadelphia type)
  • ½ cup of whole milk
  • chives
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Parmesan

Salmon
Salmon

Broccoli
Broccoli

Preparation:

  1. Separate broccoli into smaller pieces.  Place in a large pot, with 1/3 cup of water and season with salt. Cook over medium heat for about 8 -10 minutes, until it is “al dente“ (tender with a little crisp). Set aside.
  2. Cut your salmon into about 2x3 cm pieces and season with salt. Heat some olive oil in a pan over medium heat and fry salmon pieces until outside crispy but inside, still moist.
  3. Cook tortiglioni in salty water according to instructions on package.
  4. Meanwhile, chop shallot, garlic and chives.  Set chives aside and sauté onion and garlic on a medium heat until tender.
  5. Add cream cheese and wait until it melts. Dilute with milk, season with salt, pepper and chives and let the flavours incorporate for 1-2 min.
  6. Drain your pasta, add to the pan with creamy sauce and heat for additional 2 minutes so that the pasta soaks in some sauce.
  7. Add the salmon and broccoli to the pan and with quick moves, just incorporate in pasta.
  8. Serve immediately sprinkled with grated parmesan.

Briefly about Brassica oleraceaitalica or simply Broccoli

It is a native of the Mediterranean region, more precisely Italy as the Latin name says. It has been grown in that area since the time of the ancient Romans in the 6th Century BC.

Despite its origin, nowadays China is the largest exporter of broccoli, producing over 8 million tons a year.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family, making it a cruciferous vegetable.This group also includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and turnips.

Its name is derived from the Italian word “broccolo”, meaning the flowering top of a cabbage.

Nutritional facts:You often see broccoli on the lists of the most beneficial food types, and it is not a coincidence. Here are the main reasons for not excluding it from your plate:

- One cup of raw chopped broccoli will give you your entire daily needed intake of Vitamin C

- It is also very high in Vitamin A

- Contains a significant amount of both soluble and insoluble fiber

- Broccoli contains the flavonoid kaempferol which is an anti-inflammatory agent. Broccoli seems to be slightly anti-inflammatory due to its content of this agent.

- It´s caloric value is 148 kg per 100 g.