Tips for Beginners: How to Emulsify Eggs without Breaking a Sweat

How To Emulsify Eggs Without Breaking a Sweat Emulsifying eggs is one of those tasks that at the outset seem deceptively simple. After all, we are talking about mixing basic ingredients together right? How hard could that be? Surprisingly,...

How To Emulsify Eggs Without Breaking a Sweat
How To Emulsify Eggs Without Breaking a Sweat

Emulsifying eggs is one of those tasks that at the outset seem deceptively simple. After all, we are talking about mixing basic ingredients together right? How hard could that be? Surprisingly, it can be about as challenging as squeezing into a pair of skinny jeans that are just a wee bit too small. In other words, it’s doable but the uninitiated are likely to break a mild sweat in the process. With that said, we here at Cilantro wanted to share the secret to making a stress-free, cold egg emulsion:

Ingredients For Making Mayonnaise
Ingredients For Cold Emulsion

Before we get into the whisk and bolts of it though, let’s crack open the science books for a quick refresher. An emulsion can be warm or cold. Warm egg emulsions are generally used to make sauces like hollandaise. Cold egg emulsions, on the other hand, are typically used to make condiments like mayonnaise. They are basically a mixture of three ingredients, two of which are not compatible. The third ingredient, the emulsifier, is like the mediator of sorts. It is designed to bring the two non-compatible ingredients together and hold them into place. That’s where the challenging part comes in.

In order to make either type of egg emulsion picture perfect, you are going to need to start with high-quality, fresh, pure ingredients. That’s because age, quality and purity all play a role in whether or not your egg emulsion will stay together or fall apart. Take cholesterol-reduced eggs for example. They are notorious for making an unstable emulsion. The same can be said for eggs that are close to their expiration date.

If you are making a cold emulsion, like a basic mayonnaise, you’ll need the following items:

  • 2 tbsp. Lemon juice or white vinegar
  • Metal whisk or electric mixer
  • 1 mixing bowl, clean and dry
  • 1 cup Olive oil, extra light
  • ½ tsp. Table salt
  • 2 Eggs

Start by making sure that all of your ingredients and utensils are at room temperature. Then place the table salt and one egg yolk into the mixing bowl. Whisk them together first. Then add the lemon juice and whisk the mixture again. Now comes the sensitive part. Slowly whisk the oil into the mixture a drop at a time. If you try and rush the process, your cold egg emulsion will not come out perfect.

Making Mayonnaise
Making Mayonnaise

If you do get a little “happy” with the oil, there is one trick that may help pull your cold egg emulsion back from the brink of disaster. Grab a second egg and place its yolk in a fresh bowl. Beat the yolk and then slowly whisk the broken mixture, a spoonful at a time, into the new bowl. Once the emulsion reaches the desired consistency, stop and admire your undeniable brilliance.

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